Category Archives: Uncategorized

Old Healthcare Policy Renewal

Let’s start this week off with cartograms. Sometimes I like the idea, sometimes not so much. Here is a case where I really do not care for the New York Times’ visualisation of the data. Probably because the two cartograms, a before and after of health policy renewals, do not really allow for a great side-by-side comparison. I imagine there is probably a way of condensing all of that information into a single chart or graphic component.

The before map

The before map

Credit for the piece goes to Keith Collins, Josh Katz, Katie Thomas, Archie Tse, and Karen Yourish.

New Layout

A ways back I decided that when the mobile viewership of Coffee Spoons reached a certain threshold I would implement a new, more mobile-friendly theme—something simpler and faster. Well last week you all crossed that threshold and so today we have a new and responsive theme. I am sure that there will be kinks, but I will deal with them when they arise. For now, enjoy the new design.

Orange is the New Pink

Orange County California was the bastion of California Republicans. I remember even hearing about it as such all the way out on the East Coast. But, the times are changing in Orange County. And so are the demographics. The Los Angeles Times released this interactive slider map showing the changes to the Republican landscape from 2004 to 2012. Orange County has gone from blood red to at best a tender pink while Democrats salivate around the table.

Orange County Republican Party

Orange County Republican Party

Credit for the piece goes to Doug Smith.

Craft Breweries

From the Atlantic Cities, an offshoot of the Atlantic magazine, comes a nice Friday/for-the-weekend post. It looks at states that have the most craft breweries? Surprise, the states with the largest populations! But then comes the more interesting follow-up, what if we account for population differences? Ah, now we are talking. The visualisation type is a choropleth. Nothing fancy. But, hey, it’s a Friday. So bottom’s up. Cheers. Slainte. Salud. Enjoy the weekend.

Craft Breweries per 100,000

Craft Breweries per 100,000

Credit for the map goes to Zara Matheson.

Oh(lder) Canada

Canada is getting old. At least so the Canadian census data says. As a percentage of the population, the map made by the National Post below looks at where the old people are. Within reason, one would expect to perhaps see a more even distribution across all of Canada. However, it appears that the northern territories and provinces have fewer old people than their southern counterparts.

Old Canada

Old Canada

Credit for the piece goes to Andrew Barr, Jonathon Rivait, and Richard Johnson.

Canada Invades the Land of the Mole People

Subways. Home of the mole people. And in the United States an unwanted recipient of government money to build things. Along with being generally unwanted. By those who do not live in cities. Probably because of said mole people. Or something.

But in Canada, they like subways. At least enough that Toronto is building an extension to a university and from there to a suburb. But the invasion of the mole people homeland is a complex process that, fortunately, the National Post explains in an illustrative infographic, a cropping of which is below.

One of four sibling boring machines: Holey, Moley, Yorkie, and Torkie.

One of four sibling boring machines: Holey, Moley, Yorkie, and Torkie.

Credit for the piece goes to Mike Faille and Peter Kuitenbrouwer.

The Election in the Burbs

One area of particular contention for the American presidential candidates this year will be in the suburbs of major urban areas. This was where Romney in particular was able to defeat his Republican rivals, but is also home to large number of potential Obama supporters. Given his likely support in cities, Romney will need to well in the suburbs this time around.

The Washington Post looks at how suburban counties voted over the past two elections.

Cropping of the map

Cropping of the map

Credit for the piece goes to Ted Mellnik, Laura Stanton, and Karen Yourish.

The Cities of Champions

From Slate comes an interactive map of which cities have won what championships across the big four sports (baseball, basketball, football, and hockey). It plots the championships over time and allows the user to see just how dominant certain cities have been in certain sports.

Where the winners won

Where the winners won

Credit for the piece goes to Chris Kirk.