Tag Archives: demographics

Explaining Why Some People Are Losing Their Health Insurance Plans

I have received a few questions in the non-blog world about why certain people have been receiving notices in the post that they are about to lose their insurance plans. The short answer for many of those people is that they likely bought individual, private plans and those plans fall short of the new minimum requirements. But, if you are not satisfied with that explanation, the New York Times does a much better job explaining it than I ever could. It is a piece worth a quick read.

The private insurance market

The private insurance market

Credit for the piece goes to Larry Buchanan, Alicia Parlapiano, and Karen Yourish.

Differences in Population Growth and What That Means

Last week the Washington Post published a piece that looked at demographic trends and their impact on the world’s different geographies. None of the graphics in the piece are revolutionary, nor are they mind-blowing fantasticness. They are, however, clear and concise and show the story. In fact the overall piece is well done because while the graphics show the trends and trajectories, the written word above and below the graphics explains some of the underlying causes and potential effects. In short, a solid piece that is worth the read.

Population growth centred in Sub-Saharan Africa

Population growth centred in Sub-Saharan Africa

Credit for the piece goes to Max Fisher.

The Origin of Beer

Today’s post comes via Business Insider. They linked to work by reddit user sp07 who mapped out words used for common objects across Europe and then looked at those words by their origin. But of all words, this is probably the most important.

The linguistic origin of beer

The linguistic origin of beer

Credit for the piece goes to sp07.

The Young and the Educated

Today’s piece comes from the National Journal. It is an interactive bubble chart that compares the educated class of cities in 1980 to those in 2010 (educated meaning the share of population with at least a bachelor’s degree).

College graduate cities

College graduate cities

Not a whole lot to say about this one, in a good way. A nice summation at the top with clearly presented data below while annotations on the plot call out particular objects in the series worth noting. And then for those who want to find themselves, a drop down filter at the top allows users to select a particular city.

Credit for the piece goes to Brian McGill and Nancy Cook.

Scale of Syria’s Refugees

So that civil war in Syria thing, yeah, it’s still going on, folks. And lots of people—7,000,000 of them—have been forced to flee to either external or internal locations. Al Jazeera has attempted to put that number into context for Americans using US census data and maps.

Here is a look at both Philadelphia and Chicago for comparison’s sake. The interactive application has a few pre-selected options, or you can find your own US locale.

Syrian refugees based on Philadelphia's population

Syrian refugees based on Philadelphia’s population

Syrian refugees based on Chicago's population

Syrian refugees based on Chicago’s population

Credit for the piece goes to Michael Keller.

Virginia Election Results

Last night was election night. Okay, maybe not the big midterm, but there were still a few interesting races. The one I want to look at it, however, is the gubernatorial race in Virginia. Maps are pretty much the default in big, statewide races like these and it is no surprise that the three screenshots here are use a map as an anchor component.

The Huffington Post uses a scatterplot to compare the margin of victory for Terry McAuliffe to that of Barack Obama in 2012. A technical flaw places the drop down menu atop the plot, unfortunately, but the component works to show differences in just one year.

Huffington Post results

Huffington Post results

Over at the New York Times, the Virginia results were given a nice overview. Here they used a text summary to explain the race in short. They used a small amount of space to show polling results over time. And then beneath the map they looked at recent elections across the state.

New York Times results

New York Times results

The Washington Post, which reports to the northern counties of Virginia, had a much simpler piece. They used solely a map to present the data.

Washington Post results

Washington Post results

Credit for the Huffington Post piece goes to Aaron Bycoffe, Jay Boice, and Hilary Fung.

Credit for the New York Times piece goes to the New York Times’ graphics department.

Credit for the Washington Post piece goes to the Washington Post’s graphics department.

Three Hops From Norway

The thing with the NSA spy scandal is not that it collects data on Americans. But it collects data on the Americans that the Americans that the Americans know. Three degrees of separation can actually be quite a few people whose privacy is violated in the name of security. The Guardian has an excellent piece that shows you as in you yourself—if you grant access to your Facebook profile—how many people could be investigated because you know them.

My personal three hops

My personal three hops

Well, I hate to tell you, Norway. But apparently, with me you are far from safe. Or at least a Norway-sized chunk of the American population. More seriously, this is a great piece that personalises an abstract sort of concept. Not just through the use of your own personal data, but by using (potentially) familiar items to contextualise scale. How many people is 190? Almost two Concordes worth. How many is 4,779,123 people? More than the population of Norway. You know, a country. Well done, Guardian.

Credit for the piece goes to the Guardian’s US Interactive Team.

Mapping Public Health Data

Today’s piece maps and charts comes from the Illinois Department of Public Health. The piece combines maps and charting components to detail preventable hospitalisations and emergency room use in the state of Illinois.

Public health map

Public health map

Ordinarily I would prefer just one map, however, in this case the designers realised that a regional map—with its larger surface area—need not be as large as the county map. Some additional elements worth noting is the area devoted to the human explanation of the categories, which might otherwise be difficult to understand.

Credit for the piece goes to Axis Maps.

The Roma of Europe

The Roma, or the Gypsies, are a displaced population living throughout Europe. They have been in the news recently. In France, a family was deported to Kosovo after their asylum appeal was rejected after a few years. However, the deportation removed a girl from a French school and the outcry was sufficient that President Hollande intervened. The girl—but not her family—is being allowed to return to France to complete her education. Also last week, Greek police picked up a fair-skinned, blonde-haired, green-eyed girl from a Roma camp because she did not look like her family. They performed a genetic test and found she was of no relation and fear the child was kidnapped. A bit earlier than last week, the French interior minister said that most Roma were not capable of integrating into French society and that they should leave France. And so the New York Times put together a piece supporting an article about the Roma population in Europe that is worth a quick look if you want to better understand the Roma diaspora.

The Roma diaspora

The Roma diaspora

Credit for the piece goes to the New York Times graphics department.