Tag Archives: economics

The Reforestation of Europe

We hear a lot about deforestation around the world. But, in this piece from the Washington Post, we see how over the last century, Europe has actually managed to reverse that trend and reforest parts of the continent.

A look at the western Mediterranean

A look at the western Mediterranean

Credit for the piece goes to Rock Noack.

Where the (Disproportionate) Jobs Are

A little while ago, LinkedIn put together a map looking at the disproportionately represented jobs and skills in cities in both the United States and Europe. That is different from the most common jobs but those that are “most uniquely found” in cities.

The unique skills of America's various cities

The unique skills of America’s various cities

Unfortunately the interface is a bit clumsy. For something that is about exploring different cities, I think the small area of the map could be bigger. And the highlighting functionality lags. But the overall idea is interesting.

And on a side note, while graphic design is not specifically covered, I found the list of skills for Chicago surprising. If only because I work as a designer for a company in the market research industry.

Kind of explains a lot. Well, to me.

Kind of explains a lot. Well, to me.

Credit for the piece goes to Sohan Murthy.

After the Curtain Dropped

Last week we covered the fall of the Berlin Wall and the lasting impact in former East Germany vs. former West Germany. This week we look at a piece from Bloomberg Businessweek that looks more broadly at Eastern Europe.

Looking at GDP per capita

Looking at GDP per capita

The piece scrolls with the charts updating based upon the available text. And within that text are highlighted keywords with which the user can interact to highlight data within the charts.

Credit for the piece goes to Alex McIntyre, Peter Coy, Christopher Cannon, and Blacki Migliozzi.

New New Orleans

Nine years after the impact of Hurricane Katrina upon the city of New Orleans, the touristy French Quarter has returned according to an article in the National Journal. However, the new New Orleans beyond the French Quarter is different from what once was. In short, the new city is whiter and more Hispanic.

And while this graphic that accompanies the piece does a fair job of showing the title, a snapshot, I wish the focus would have been on more of a comparison between pre and post, old and new.

A quick look at New Orleans

A quick look at New Orleans

I would not necessarily chosen the same components to tell the story. But, I really want to see more direct comparisons of even just the 2000 census and data to that of 2010.

Credit for the piece goes to the National Journal’s graphics department.

Importing Russian Gas

Today’s post is a graphic from the New York Times that looks at Russia’s hold on energy across Europe. I’m not terribly keen on this particular graphic for a few reasons. First, the design needs to incorporate the actual datapoint so the reader can compare across countries. Comparing the height of each black bar to each other is difficult at best.

Secondly, the data excludes the energy trade between European Union countries. And that strikes me as potentially quite a lot. Just because a country is importing from another EU country does not mean it is importing less.

Russian gas market in the EU

Russian gas market in the EU

Credit for the piece goes to the New York Times graphics department.

Farewell, Summer (Jobs)

Sorry (American) folks, but Labour Day just came and went. And for us (Americans) that means summer has “officially” ended. Back in the day, for your humble author, that meant preparing to wrap up my summer employment at the Jersey Shore. The Sidewalk Sale was the great clearing of summer stock and most of us teenagers’ last working day. Fast-forward a decade and it turns out most teenagers are no longer working summer jobs. Five Thirty Eight put together a small set of graphics to support an article explaining the decline. (It’s not all recession-related.)

Teen employment in summer by gender

Teen employment in summer by gender

Welcome to autumn, folks.

Credit for the piece goes to Ben Casselman.

The Distribution of Debt in the United States

In a good example of comparing share versus actuals, the National Journal looks at the state of debt across the United States. The choropleth map shows adult share of debt while the bar charts show the regional value of said debt. While the south holds more debt, the west and east coasts have more debt. They also, however, have higher incomes that make servicing or paying off said debt easier than lower income adults in the south.

The South's victory is debt

The South’s victory is debt

Credit for the piece goes to Nancy Cook and Stephanie Stamm.

Growth of Inland Cities

Some of the nation’s fastest growing cities are inland, away from the coast where housing prices are high. To support an article about the demographic shift, the New York Times created this map. Circle size represents growth over a six-year period while the colour of the bubble represents housing prices.

Fastest growing cities

Fastest growing cities

Credit for the piece goes to the New York Times graphics department.

Coal vs. the Great Barrier Reef

Your humble author is away this week. But the Great Barrier Reef in Australia is still here. For now. The Guardian takes a look at the growing threat to the World Heritage site from the coal industry in Queensland, Australia. The author takes you through the narrative in a chapter format, using charts and maps to illustrate the points in the brief bit of text. A really nice job altogether.

Major ports and their volume

Major ports and their volume

Credit for the piece goes to Nick Evershed.